Hello, I’m Sue

I was released from federal prison in 2003.
I can still be denied employment, housing, or education – to this day.

Upcoming Event:

Employer Convening

March 3, 2020

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Partnering for an Inclusive Workforce

Recruit, hire and retain people with conviction histories, including formerly incarcerated talent (FIT™).

The Stigma We Carry

Labeling others allows us to keep people at a distance, on the margins, and locked out of opportunities.

Leadership

Leadership training is essential for people with conviction histories to be effective and innovative community leaders.

Tell Us Your Story

Have you been denied employment, housing, education, or other opportunities? We want to hear from you.

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Get Involved

Learn about volunteering, building connections, and/or contributing to What’s Next Washington.

About Us

Our Board of Directors and our
core beliefs.

We have a punishment problem in this country

In the United States 70 million people have been convicted of a crime, with an expected 100 million by 2030. Of those 2.5 million are in prisons and jails and 4.5 million are on probation or parole.

WHERE ARE THE OTHER 63 MILLION?

The US unemployment rate is currently under 4%. But for people with conviction histories? It’s 27%. What’s Next Washington wants to end the economic death sentence of a conviction history.

Million Americans With a Conviction History

Million with a Conviction by 2030

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U.S. Unemployment Rate

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Unemployment w/ Conviction History